My Work: The Go-To Source

Former presidents, college professors, and other scholars have cited Robert’s work in recent years:

  • Chilean Ministry of National Defense’s Revista Política y Estrategia cited the article “U.S. and China: The Fight for Latin America” in its piece “Global Re-insertion, Repositioning and Re-signification of China” No. 126-2015.
  • Small Wars Journal cited the article “Mexican Drug Cartels Are Not Terrorists” in its piece “Terrorism and Organized Crime: Exploring the Mexican Situation”, October 16, 2015.
  • The University of Toledo Law Review cited the article “Calming Colombia and Nicaragua’s Murky Waters,” 46, No. 3, Spring 2015.
  • Brookings Institution’s Director of Latin America Initiative, Harold Trinkunas, cited the article “State of Affairs: The Nascent Venezuelan-Colombian Relations” in his book “American Crossings: Border Politics in the Western Hemisphere”, published by Johns Hopkins University Press on November 2015.
  • Authors of the book “U.S. Military Operations: Law, Policy, and Practice”, published by Oxford University Press, cited the article “Colombia and FARC: Will the Internal Conflict Reach an End?” in its chapter “Detention Operations: A Strategic View.” Book published on October/December 2015.
  • The Harvard National Security Journal cited the article “Mexican Drug Cartels Are Not Terrorists,” 6, 2015.
  • The Mexican Senate’s Gilberto Bosques Center of International Studies cited the article, “Pacific Alliance: A Promising Yardstick of Latin America’s Prosperity,” in its report “The Pacific Alliance: The Future of Latin American integration?” Published on March 2014.
  • The Brooklyn Journal of International Law cited the article “How the Latin American Press Is Losing Its Voice,” 39, No.2, 2014.
  • The Valparaiso University Law Review cited the article, “How the U.S. War on Drugs Casts a Shadow over Communities of Color,” in its scholarly piece, “The U.S. War on Drugs and Black Men as Non-Citizens,” Volume 47 Number 3, pp. 89-129.
  • The Journal of Hispanic Studies cited the article, “Wikileaks and Latin America,” in its piece, “Artigas and the New Left in Uruguayan Theater,” 2013, pp. 127-149.
  • Global Security Studies cited the article, “The Curious Case of World Court’s Territorial Rulings,” in its piece “Nicaragua v Colombia: A Stalemate in the Caribbean,” 2013, Issue 4.
  • Gale Cengage Learning printed the article, “The Wait Is Over: Congress Awards Free Trade Agreements, Ignoring Workers’ Plight,” for the book Opposing Viewpoints: Free Trade, Greenhaven Press, 2013, Chapter 3, pp.103-108.
  • Former President of Mexico Carlos Salinas de Gortari discussed his position on the war on drugs by citing the article, “War on Drugs: A Pan-Regional Fight,” in his book Democracia Republicana: Ni Estado Ni Mercado, Una Alternativa Ciudadana (“Republican Democracy: A Citizen’s Alternative”), Random House Mondadori, 2010, pg. 826-828.
  • The Journal of Development Studies cited the article, “Colombia and FARC: Will the Civil War Have an End?” in its piece, “The Shape of Corruption: Colombia as a Case Study,” Taylor & Francis, 2013, pp. 1-14.
  • The U.S. Army War College’s report, “In Support of the Common Defense: A Homeland Defense and Security Journal,” cited the article “Mexican Drug Cartels Are Not Terrorists” U.S. Army War College Press, June 2013.
  • Yale Journal of International Laws article, “Mexico’s Drug ‘War’: Drawing a Line Between Rhetoric and Reality,” cited the piece, “From Montevideo to Washington: A New Dawn for Drug Policy,” Spring 2013.
  • The World Affairs Council of Northern California selected the article “The (Other) Longest War” as part of its 2011 Global Town Hall series to discuss the effects of the war on drugs.
  • The University of Florida’s Institute on United States Foreign Policy selected the article, “After Bin Laden’s Demise, Are U.S. Latin American Relations at Bay?” as part of its 2011 syllabus and recommended reading for its Ph.D. students.
  • In November 2011, UK-based think tank The Henry Jackson Society cited the article, “Congress Awards Free Trade Agreements,” in its report “The Next Phase in American Free Trade: Colombia, Panama, and South Korea.”